Welcome to fotoVUE

We work with the best landscape and outdoor photographers to produce and publish high quality photo-location guidebooks. As well as guiding you to the best places to take photographs in an area, our guidebooks are full of inspirational photography and give technical advice on how to take the best photographs.

Peak District Pre-orders Available NOW

Photographing The Peak District by Chris Gilbert and Mick Ryan will be available at the beginning of August. It weighs in at 480 pages with over 150 locations guiding you to the best places for landscape and rural photography in the Peak – the UK’s first national park; from the tops of Kinder to the bottom of the limestone dales, down country lanes to the industrial heritage of Richard Arkwrights cotton mills, to the country estates of Chatsworth and Haddon Hall.

News

Photographer Andrew Yu describes a very special morning in the Peak District, one that he will never forget. After getting one set of amazing images looking down the Hope Valley from Mam Tor, should he take the risk of a 20-minute drive to another location?
fotoVUE’s sixth photo-location guidebook is about to go to the printers. Photographing The Peak District by Chris Gilbert and Mick Ryan will be available at the beginning of August. It weighs in at 496 pages with over 150 locations guiding you to the best places for landscape and rural photography in the Peak District – […]
By George! is a regular photography column at fotoVUE by George Johnson, author and photographer of the forthcoming Photographing London. Sign up to our newsletter here to get alerts about all of our articles and discounts on our photo-location guidebooks. Ilook back and I miss those times when I used to pick up the camera […]

Features

The Peak District is a beautiful upland area at the southern end of the Pennines stretching from Ashbourne in the south to the M62 in the north.
In November 2016, fotoVUE director Stuart Holmes went on a month-long expedition with friends to attempt a previously unclimbed peak in the shadow of the third highest mountain in the world. 
'I tried to track down the thickest pocket of mist and fog but I realised I was going to have to run for half-a-mile up a steep hill to get the first light. I got to the top and frantically set up my camera coughing, shaking and hyperventilating.' Richard Fox shares his Best Ten.