The Peak District


fotoVUE’s sixth photo-location guidebook is about to go to the printers Photographing The Peak District by Chris Gilbert and Mick Ryan will be available at the beginning of August. It weighs in at 480 pages with over 150 locations guiding you to the best places for landscape and rural photography in the Peak – the UK’s first national park; from the tops of Kinder to the bottom of the limestone dales, down country lanes to the industrial heritage of Richard Arkwrights cotton mills, to the country estates of Chatsworth and Haddon Hall. There are over 750 photographs and the usual precise OS maps and directions, plus lots of photographic tips, best times to visit, even a list of the best pubs in the Peak for the thirsty and the hungry. It’s a photo-location and visitors guidebook suitable if you have a high end DSLR or a mobile phone camera, whether you are spending a week there or a day, it will guide you to the most stunningly beautiful places. Below are four sample viewpoints from Photographing The Peak District.

Featured Viewpoints

Parkhouse and Chrome Hills

A firm favourite with photographers of the Peak District, the beautiful and elegant twin peaks of Chrome (often pronounced 'Kroom') and Parkhouse Hills look lovely at any time of year and can be photographed from almost any direction, such is their appeal. These incongruous hills are the remains of...

Haddon Hall

The origins of Haddon Hall date back to 1066 and William the Conqueror, whose illegitimate son William Peverell the Elder first held the manor. The hall passed to the the Avenell family and then by marriage to Sir Richard Vernon, and eventually to the Manners family when it became...

The Great Ridge

Across the Vale of Edale from Kinder runs the Great Ridge, a wonderful rollercoaster of shale grit hills stretching from Lord’s Seat in the west to Lose Hill in the east. It is a fabulous and very popular day walk and its accessibility and compositional strength means that it...

Peter’s Stone and Cressbrook Dale

Peter’s Stone is a distinctive limestone knoll that sits at the head of the narrow limestone valley of Cressbrook Dale. Geologists think this pinnacle slid downhill on a layer of clay from the main formation of limestone millions of years ago. It has a grisly human history. It is...